Warwick Street
North of Atlantic

Originally part of the Schenck Farm. Originally known as Washington Street, when the run from Warwick to Linwood was named after the first five Presidents.

Click on thumbnails to enlarge

Jamaica and Warwick, 1917
Starting at the top, with 2 great contributions from the Brian Merlis Archives. Anyone from the neighborhood that went by the Warwick St. entrance to Highland Park would recognize this corner and house.
29 Ridgewood
A closeup of a familiar house, from the 1939 tax photos and today.
Ridgewood Avenue, East New York, Brooklyn
Maker: Art Novelty & Postcard Co. Dated: Unk Status: Own(BG)
The very start of Ridgewood Avenue, from Warwick looking east towards Ashford. That's 29 Warwick on the left. Ridgewood Ave. gets paved relatively early to offer an alternative to Jamaica Ave., which had heavy traffic competing with the trolley cars. On the right is a view from 2007.
Jamaica and Warwick, 1895
Part of the Schenck Homestead is visible. The Warwick St. entrance to Highland Park on the right is from 2005. Rod Maggio notes those yellow poles were to deter residents who were driving down that path to avoid having to back up on Sunnyside!
Warwick Street, East New York
Maker:Unk Status: Need
Great early 1900's photo postcard of what appears to be the east side of Warwick north of Arlington. All the way on the left looks like Highland Park. Neil managed to line up the shot in this 2006 photo.
Arlington Avenue ,East New York, Brooklyn
Maker: Souvenir Post Card Co. Dated: 1917 Status: Own (RG)

The postcard view and the 2005 picture is looking east, across Warwick, with the library on the left. If you look on the right hand side, a few houses down, one is marked with an "X". The sender of the card in 1917 was marking his house.
Southeast corner, Warwick and Arlington
1939 and today. Elsie Anzalone recalls the Gallo family lived there. Dennis Chiocco recalls his uncle Patty lived there, and provides some great color in the story below.
Northwest corner, Warwick and Arlington
Vincent Luongo was the first person to remind me (back in 2005!) this was the office of dentist Dr. Joseph Miranda. Tim O'Reilly and Judy Close also noted this, and Judy told us Dr. Miranda's father Mike Miranda ran a grocery store on Atlantic and Essex Street. It's hard to recognize the old 1941 tax photo compared to the current house.
Oddly, it is not the house I remember but the sloped bluestone grading that lined the block. I walked along Arlington many times as a youngster and distinctly recall walking up those little slopes. The picture on the left is from an Anniversary parade in 1966. There is a page devoted to the parades located here.. The family photo to the right is from 1964; both display the grading the way I remember it.
> Neil Sullivan comes through with a 2006 shot of this house on the southwest corner of Arlington and Warwick, it has managed to retain it distinctive roof.
Warwick St., south of Arlington circa 1972
Richard Adazzio took these shots around 1972 or 1973 for a paper he was working on. Rich even IDs his 1971 Nova.
Warwick St., Brooklyn
Dated: 1912 Maker: Wm. Fick Status: Own(RG)
That building on the northeast corner is visible in this 1912 postcard. The BEDC site pegs the construction date as 1920, which is incorrect. Odd that Fick did not note the orientation, which is a view north up Fulton. Also deceptive; the next house up appears to standing next to apartment building, but that is an illusion as the 2006 photo shows both the house and a garage in between. Neil supplied the 2006 view.
This is the northeast corner of Warwick and Fulton, in a 1939 tax photo and today
Another great time capsule shot from Phil Santella, this one is on Warwick Street looking north towards the el of the neighborhood gang. Phil IDs as follows:"Joey Cola in ctr. with arms spread. Raffaele,Phil, and Nina Vitucci. Jackie Durando hanging out car door. Moe Morrison, Dottie, Ginny and Red Benson,head out the window" . The update shot is from 2006.
Atlantic and Warwick
Warwick St. had an LIRR station on Atlantic Ave. The turn of the century photo is from aRRt's aRRchives, showing the ground level version. The 1930 photo on the right shows the elevated version, prior to the LIRR going underground.